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time in the most dramatic possible way. we had the chance conversations of the civil rights movement, and a life or death decisions be made during the cuban missile crisis. people often ask me why my father installed the system it as a lover of history i know he would've been drawn to this new technology as a way of keeping an accurate record of events for the memoir he planned to write after leaving office. and after the bay of pigs disaster, people say he wanted to be able to remember who said what in case they later changed their tune. [laughter] the wonderful thing about this book is that although much of this material has been available, it has not been easily accessible until now. the original recordings are of varying quality and it isn't always clear who is speaking in meetings. working with maura, our outstanding archivist and her colleagues here at the libra, historian ted widmer did an incredible job of selecting highlights from the most significant crises as well as excerpts to show the range and complexity of issues facing the president. as a citizen in an election seaso
with affirmative action, and at the time, as you may have read and not remember, the civil rights movement, martin luther king turned to full employment and poor people's campaign as the principal demand, and the johnson administration rather than coming up with full employment we spotted with affirmative action. you won't see look at the eyes on the prize or marching in the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, asians, native americans, that was the vision. and she said when affirmative action happened, we knew it would only help the upper-middle-class within the black community, a very small percentage of african-americans, kids who want to go to these elite colleges, you know, that affirmative action was targeted or would benefit from. but we were scared of being read beaded and ostracized or attack so we backed down and just accepted that. he said we knew the poverty would remain in these basic issues of economic injustice would be made. i say this to say that movements can be the railed. they can be intimidated, th
right decides to make an argument that is insane, they jump on the civil rights movement or slavery and try to latch their argument onto the history -- >> yes. >> as if they give a damn. as if they would have been up at the front for the fight. >> exactly. >> you don't remember ted nugent standing in front of everyone m the civil rights marches. >> i remember him refusing to go to vietnam. i remember him getting out of going to vietnam and being afraid to carry a gun when his country asked him to carry a gun. he was a coward. these guys always jump on slavery and the civil rights movement. ths offensive. if slaves hadn't been owned by other people there wouldn't have been slavery either. >> this is what's happening now is something we've been talking about for five years. that is the extreme right, let's call it what it is, has gone on about barack obama as a socialist, as -- conspiracy theories about secret plans to take guns and dominate the country, and now because biden comes out and talks about high-capacity magazines they say finally, we finally have something -- >> nailed the
of the civil rights movement and the birm birmingham children's mar pch which broke the back of the birmingham massive resistance against civil rights when you started to see the teenagers and the young people and you realized, oh, wait a minute the injustices to youth and families helps to galvanize the american consciousness, but as you pointed out, the biggest piece of it was showing a pathway to the administration legally of what to do, and when you look at the new action that the president and the administration have taken around families that will take effect in march, and what is after that? if we have younger family members addressed and some families addressed, it seems a lot of hole, and so how does the movement embodied by la raza start to move forward? >> well, obviously, we want to continue to move for the comprehensive immigration reform and have a law passed to deal with this in a permanent way. and the president's action while important step to provide relief to the young people, the dreamer, it is not permanent. we do need comprehensive immigration reform. and we are looking a
starting point is where people are. it may be that labor is a spent force and that civil-rights organizations are spent forces and the community-based organizations are narrow minded and too anxious to just get a foundation grant for government low-income tax credit to build five units of housing and it will not change the system, but that is where people are. for the last four years i have been working with the building insurance, the widest part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try and get a young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so that they can become the green work force of the future. the building trade, conservative as they are, operates 1200 job training centers in the construction trade and is the second-largest mechanism outside the navy. guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth bills, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say -- how do we change and improve? the national leadership of the building trade has gone across 350 c
. how do we build a democratic party in the south without giving up civil rights, women's reproductive rights and build a big tent? >> i would remind us of one word, work. that's what's ahead of us. we have a path. we have seen nationally that i think the presidency favors democrats. the real work is going to be exactly where you pointed out, state legislatures. in 2010, we vis rate at the gubernatorial level. in 2010, we got killed. we have to build that back and we need to put together a concrete plan to take the house. we have to stay in the future business. by that, the republicans continue to practice the politics of subtraction. that's a losing strategy nationally. it's not impacted them locally. it's up to local democrats to say we are the one who is care about the middle class. we are the ones who don't encourage vaginal probes for women -- >> unless they want them. >> we are the ones who try to make sure african-americans have the right to vote. we are the ones who believe in the dream act. we are the ones who believe in inclusion for gay and lesbians. >> it's a messaging piec
. >>> at the heart of barack obama's presidency is a commitment to civil rights. he always represented the ideas of justice, equality and opportunity. and he never forgot where he came from. remember senator obama's famous speech in selma? >> but something is stirring across the country because of what happened in selma, alabama because some folks are willing to march across the bridge. don't tell me i'm not coming home when i come to selma, alabama. i'm here because somebody marched for our freedom. i'm here because your sacrifice for me. i stand on the shoulders of giants. >> one of the giants he's talking about was dr. martin luther king, jr. and today, we'll learn about a powerful tribute the president has that the world will see. stay with us. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. my ex-girlfriend... 7th grade math teacher. who is this? that's pete. my... [ dennis' voice ] allstate agent. a
who she is and why you think she's such a good pick. >> she was formerly the wife of the slain civil rights leader medger everies in jackson mississippi, in front of his wife and children, by a back-shooting coward by the name of byron beckwith. she pursued the case for 30 years and got a brave attorney to take her case. it was made into movie called " "ghosts of mississippi." she has been a stalwart, stubborn, wonderful lady who dedicated herself to getting justice for her husband and finally got it. and remarkably this is the first time a non-clergymen or non-clergy person has been allowed to give the invocation at a presidential inaugural. i think it's terrific. i think it to put her in the spotlight is a great thing. >> jennifer: well, i think it is a great symbol as well, and i appreciate, as always, your insights, and you are one of our favorite columnists, so thank you, charlie for sharing with us. charlie pierce of "esquire" magazine. health insurance companies were given an inch. now they're taking a whole yard. they just cannot seem to help themselves. we'll hear about that
various views with legal and justice organizations. civil rights organizations, participation in national service organizations from one club to the rotary club. youth groups, campus groups, peace groups. gun safety advocates from the brady group to the major gun safety organizations. the educators that are groping for answers, the mental health community including the american academy that we have been through, it is not an extensive study. but the literature that the staff has been working. much of what we already had, trying to devour. the most interesting meeting is with an interfaith group. not only the traditional mainstream protestant churches, the catholic council of bishops, but evangelicals. they are reluctant to engage in is because it is may be an attack on a cultural thing related to gun ownership and the like. all these groups with the muslim community, the hindu community, etc.. it was really a fascinating discussion. and then we matt with sportsmen groups that is distinct from but do not disagree with the gun owner groups. they have a different perspective that includes th
significance for the inauguration because it takes place on the federal holiday honoring the civil rights leader. the president used the lincoln bible when he was sworp in four years ago and he'll use his wife's family bible for a private swearing in at the white house the day before the public ceremony. >>> a developing story out of cap da. right now marine biologists are trying to save whales trapped in ice. the 11 killer whales are sharing a single hole and the hole is shrinking as temperatures drop. one scientists think the whales got stuck during a sudden freeze. canada's government says it is aware of the situation and is trying to figure out what can be done. >>> their temperatures are dropping and ours on the rise? >> parts of siberia are 60 below zero right now and up in northern alaska, it's 25 below zero for the last couple of weeks. here? where's winter? nowhere near. gorgeous sunrise this morning in case you missed it this is the view from our hd city camera. this was right before sunrise at 7:20 a.m. on this thursday morning. you can post your pictures to weather @nbcwashing
white dead, but he is not pleading guilty to the federal charges that he violated white's civil rights by not trying to get him medical care or that he obstructed justice by filing a false report about the incident. mr. mcintosh represented he was not the first person to find him unresponsive. when in fact he did find him unresponsive >> reporter: he's facing up to 20 years. reporting live s. i'm tracee wilkins, news4. >>> a woman was groped while jogging in annandale, virginia. the latest happened last night about 5:45. the woman was 30 years old and was approached near brierwood court and patriot drive. she screamed and then he ran away. 14 other groping inns don't have happened in fairfax county since early in september. >>> a retired firefights is being held as a hero after hess pulled a woman from a burning home. that fire started about 10:00 this morning on pond meadow lane. the former prince george's county firefighters ran to the house after he saw smoke coming out of there. he saw a dog frantically barking. the dog led him to the sliding glass door in the back. he looked insid
administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 9 miles can make. -- 90 miles can make. virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best day in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas of believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens that our schools are on the way to being the most
senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
the effort was an attack on law-abiding americans. >> i'm amazed at -- as was true in the civil rights struggle in the '60s, how much deception, how much deliberate misstatement of reality is taking place in this debate. >> president clinton campaigned tirelessly for the crime bill and often surrounded by police officers who argued they were being outgunned by criminals. the white house added funds to build prisons and put more cops on the streets and ordered to draw more republican votes. even so it was political tightrope. and democrats knew it. though the ban barely survived contentious vote in the house. ultimately passing by just a two-vote martin. 216-the 214. one of the narrowist legislative victories in history. once attached to the larger crime bill the whole thing went back to congress in the fall of '1994. in his book "my life," former president clinton remembered a direct appeal from democrats. just before the house vote on the crime bill, speaker tom foley and majority leader dick gephardt made a last-ditch appeal to remove the assault weapons ban from the bill. they said
? these are civil rights. >> this is a huge mistake -- >> listen. let jennifer get in there. >> i think it's a huge mistake for lars to invent these improbables. we're talking about gun sales not gun gifts. >> yes, we are. >> no, we're not. the vice president is talking about gun sales. secondly, you just made the argument why we can't comply with those. why shouldn't we? you and larry go down to the gun shop and get it done. >> that's easy. it hasn't caused a problem. >> then we should be doing it right now. wait a second, lars, i'm not done. there is room for creative law making here. and here's what i would suggest, the president wants 100,000 teachers in america, i don't see any statistics down 100,000 teachers, how about 100,000 police officers, we'll have them armed and in the school and the fairfax -- >> i can tell you reasons that won't work. >> i like that. >> we should arm the teachers. >> no. we should have police officers. >> why not? >> because they are trained -- >> you don't trust the teachers? >> i've got to get out. >> i don't, actually. i trust the police officer better than i do
. during the civil rights movement he was kind of a hero of mine. much more so than martin luther king, because i was quite of a radical as a young person, and i was the one that thought we should shall overcome is not a effective way of gaining civil rights. i think i i thought that more confrontation was needed. >> host: what made you a radical? what does it mean? >> guest: i think a radical, -- i'm still a radical today. that is i believe that a radical is any person who believes in the official liberty and individual freedom and limited government. that makes you a radical. and i have always been a -- person who believe that people should not we are interfere with me. i should be able to do my own thing as long as i don't violate the rights other people. >> host: who is the difference of following malcom x. omar tin luther king? >> host: well, at that time i thought martin luther king was too much a compriseer. i was willing to demand people in my career in the army was a part of that vision of confronting racial discrimination. >> host: how tall are you? >> guest: six foot fight.
on the federal holiday honoring the civil rights leader. the president used the lincoln bible when he was sworn in four years ago. he'll use his wife's family bible for a private swearing-in at the white house the day before the public ceremony. >>> you can see relics from the first presidential inauguration now at mt. vernon. george washington's estate is displaying items from that historic event in honor of president obama's inauguration. you'll be able to see the suit washington wore. you can also see part of the first draft of washington's inaugural address. the suit will be on display until the end of april. the inaugural address will be on display through march. >>> imagine sharing part of your home with someone for a year and not even knowing about it. in washington state, a retired woman said she couldn't figure out why she could smell what she thought was marijuana, as well as why parts of her house were suddenly cold. she called a furnace repair man. he crawled into the crawl space below her home and that's when they figured out what was going on. >> the good news is i got the vents f
holiday honoring the civil rights leader. the president used the lincoln bible when he was sworn in four years ago. he'll use his wife's family bible for a private softwarin a day before the public ceremony. >>> today new mortgage rules being announced to -- to late to help those caught up in the mortgage crisis. w we have more. >>> good morning. the consumer finance watchdog is rolling out new rules aimed at curbing risky mortgages. the rules which take effect next year will impose a range of requirements and restrictions on banks and lenders. they'll have to verify and inspect borrowers' financial records and will be prohibited from saddling people with payments totaling 43% of their annual income. now "interest only and no doc loans" which helped inflate the housing bubble will be banned. there will be limits placed on loans that offer teaser rates that balloon after a few years. >>> plastic is proving to be popular at starbucks. a new survey by ugov.com finds more than a quarter of consumers say they've bought or plan to buy one of the coffee chain's reusable plastic coffee cups to c
pleased to announce that our administration has now restored the civil rights of more virginians than any other administration in the history of virginia. [applause] here is the plan. here in virginia, in the cradle of democracy, we enact policies that actually work. in washington, we see debt, taxes, delays, blank, and this function. function.\and dys but here in virginia, we see results, solutions, job growth, surpluses, and cooperation. what a difference 90 miles can make. [applause] virginia is ranked as america's most livable state and the best state in which to make a living. i think you will know that every other major national business publications puts virginia in the top three best states in which to do business. while that is all good, there are many areas where i believe we must play a much stronger foundation for the future of our commonwealth. this session, i am asking you to work with me to get a few big things done that i believe will create more jobs and more opportunities for our people. when you leave here on time, in 45 days, i want to be able to report to our citizens
forward as well. >> this has been through the ages, active in the women's suffrage movement and civil rights movement. >> yes. >> from the beginning. >> yes, we are founded on january 13, 1913 at howard, and the first act of the founders was to participate in the suffrage march, in march of 1913. >> we're showing here prominent deltas through the years, as we mark this centennial event. >> so many who have been a part of our organization. they've gone on of course, of course, to do great things in their life. they started out with us. barbara jordan ran for financial secretary of the sorority before she became famous. >> right. moving forward here, what do you see as the main mission? you have this wonderful grassroots movement. >> right. >> with women who are dedicated to making our communities better, the community at large better. what do you see moving forward now? >> as we celebrate, because we're having a myriad of events this year. >> yeah. >> started with the float in the rose bowl parade, where we're not only celebrating history, but making history at the same time, by being
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
>> good morning, everyone. i am barbara arnwine, direct her for civil rights under law, which runs the election protection coalition. the election protection coalition was founded roughly right after the election debacle in 2000 florida and we've been operating election protection is a program ever since and really our first up ration was in 2001. we are composed of 150 nationalized state wide, local grassroots organizations that are supplemented by the resources of 200 law firms. this last election, we have paraded 28: centers. we had omicron operations in a rickety jurisdictions. we had 5300 vehicle volunteers and roughly 2300 grassroots volunteers. as you can imagine, i'm very grateful for the opportunity to comment on the recent 2012 election. the lawyers committee will be issuing for election protection in nature report this month. so in two weeks you should be able to ask our analysis based on the roughly 190,000 calls we received, the grassroots reports from these jurisdictions and everything else. our basic code inclusion may be different from what you heard in the first p
'm going to speak with civil rights activist reverend jesse jackson about it next. later nbc news presidential historian michael beschloss on whether the debt ceiling could be a legacy trap. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. for a professional cleansing device? join the counter revolution and switch to olay pro-x. get cleansing results as effective as a $200 system. guaranteed or your money back. olay pro-x. >>> good day to all of you. welcome to "weekends with alex witt," it's 1:00 p.m. on the east coast, 10:00 a.m. out west. new today,
escape from slavery. >> what? >> for the civil right's crowd -- for the -- the hip left gay marriage is -- is up from slavery in the same sense -- >> wow. >> -- of punishment or discrimination or what have you? >> i think he is off his meds. >> stephanie: karl can you translate that? >> this is right after he started comparing the push for marriage equality to some apparent push to normalize pedophilia. >> stephanie: oh right. >> rush tries to stay away from me. and elton john performed at his last -- i guess his fourth wedding, so you don't hear him talk about it too much and he is remarkably uncomfortable when he does talk about it and it doesn't always make a lot of sense. >> stephanie: oh good. speaking of not making sense it's pastor john haggy. >> the bible requirements for getting married are these. one that you marry someone of the opposite sex. and genesis 101 says god created male and female. anything else is too disturbed people playing house. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: oh! two disturbed people playing house. wow. [ laughter ] >> i would like to point
of -- the grimms never go out of style. >> that's right. finally, a civil war card collection. >> in wednesday's kids post, we tell the story of adam webb. he's 11 years old from manassas. the national park service, in honor of this civil war, put out a set of 189 trading cards, like the ones you see here. and adam collected all 189 from boston to south carolina. he collected all of them. he loves the civil war. he's a great story. he's in wednesday's kids post. >> impressive. all right, tracy, thanks as always. for more, visit nbcwashington.com or washingtonpost.com and click on kids post. that's kids post this week on tv. >> that was cool about the eagles. i like that. >> i've seen a few running along the river early last spring. i noticed i never really get that close to one in the wild. they're big. >> they're huge. >> i was just glad he didn't look like he wanted a runner on the menu. it was a big bird. >> a lot of people run outside during the winter. today could be a decent day. >> excellent running weather for winter standards around here. the sun is out. that's the most important thin
that standard going to be and how are going to test people in a way that complies with the civil rights but, of course, has the overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out pro and con for law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado. about public safety implications and whether moving toward legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i appreciate your point that i would tell you i suppose worked a lot on my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i've heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. one thing we have to do now is come up with a standard that will protect people who come and visit our state and drive on the roads so that people know that there is going to be a safe system for them. and we're not sure yet how to do that to our legislature has this as job one that starts this next week in colorado. i think your point of view, your input would be really valuable in our state. >> you are against legalization and colorado, is that right? >> yesterday i was suppos
disarray. we're beyond division. we've got anarchy and very clearly defined tribal sectarian civil war in iraq. that's happening right now. but, most important, those men and women that we ask to fight and die, they deserve a policy worthy of their sacrifices. they, in my opinion, do not have that policy today. >> suarez: on "fox news sunday" last weekend, south carolina senator lindsey graham made clear that republicans have not forgotten or forgiven. >> i can tell you there would be very little republican support for his nomination. at the end of the day, there will be very few votes. >> suarez: meanwhile a group of republican and democratic officials have written to the president, expressing their support for hagel, and they're mounting a campaign with radio ads. >> i've know him since his early days in the senate. we have consulted and talked often about foreign policy. >> suarez: former ambassador thomas pickering is one of hagel's supporters. over a long career, he's gone through the confirmation process nine times. does this process that happens before a nomination and before a
free to use normative value-based considerations in making decisions about civil commitment. >> professor. >> i'm going to add, do this a little bit shorter, i think, which is let's start with a question to everybody in the audience. all right, so if you like chocolate cake, raise your left hand. if you do not like chocolate cake, raise your right hand. all people who like chocolate cake left hand, don't like chocolate cake right hand. all right, hands down. how many people found it difficult to raise your hand by yourself? not very many. great, you made a choice. you thought about it. you decided and you acted. and my concept of what free will is the ability to act consistent with your preferences and desires. just that simple. now how many people here feel like you have control over whether or not you like chocolate cake? raise either hands. fewer, right. so there are two different things going on that we often conflate when we talk about free will. one is your predispositions to preferences and desires, ok. that may be impulsivity, that may be violence, that may be anti-s
slaves and you're quite right, he never intended to free them, even if he had been in debt. but he did argue that to do so would be civil war and that the only solution would be a colonization scheme in which all slaves moved, whether it be the caribbean, west are back to africa. and of course you could argue that was just self-justification. but it's also a reason worth considering. i came at this very differently. as a scholar working on the british caribbean. these are some of the most brutal regimes anywhere. i was very aware that it never bothered about tomorrow's issue of slavery, never discussed it before and during the american revolution. the first place it's really discussed us here in america. and even perceives british abolition debate. and to be remarkable if slave regimes throughout history, but it's only in the western only in the 18 century that you have abolition movement, people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the sysadmin had in us empathy to realize that slaves freed with these so angry
's largest military machine, nato, right on the doorstep of this very brittle and brutal 21-month-long civil war. syrian regime shells landing inside turkey, prompting turkey's request to nato. that tension has died down. what has changed is the escalation in the conflict. rebels in the north pressing down hard on friday on a helicopter base, which they're trying to take to stop the regime's ability to project air power across the north. as the assad regime gets more desperate, many are concerned they'll reach into their arsenal, perhaps as the more deadly weapons inside, chemical weapons, which they deny having, scud-type missiles have already been used. purely to defend turkey, nato says. at the end of the day, as some say, they have skin in the game. perhaps were a shell to go astray, that may cause some ramifications for nato's patriot deployment there. all eyes watching this and certainly nato making the key point this is purely defensive. now certainly psychologically on what's happening in that border area. nick paton walsh, cnn, istanbul. >>> much more ahead this hour. >> here's what
what is realistic and what's not and that assault weapons ban is right there smack in the middle of everything. >> thanks very much, gloria. >>> more than half a million people are fleeing syria's civil war and now winter is compounding the misery for many refugees. >>> plus, details from this spectacular winter phenomena. impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance,
more fire men and civil workers down here. he needs to go and go fast. host: maxine offering her political opinion. guest: first and foremost, you are right, ohio eliminated its estate tax. it used to have an exemption of only about $385,000, one of the lowest in the country's estate death taxes. but ohio is one state that is repealing its estate tax. here in our neck of the wisdom of virginia no longer has an estate tax, while the district of columbia and maryland do. as a result, people are moving from d.c. and maryland, crossing the potomac river and taking up residence in virginia in anticipation of the death and estate tax. as far as income tax in ohio, you have township taxes in addition to the state income taxes. there is a very interesting wrinkle or sometimes it is better to file separate then -- separate than file joint returns. host: "the new york times" has a piece that talks about the high earners, but it says the legislation approved by both houses of congress would increase taxes on people with incomes that are not quite as high as well, because the bill includes l
's right. >> you can be sure that legislators and lawmakers in new york and new jersey will be making a stink if that second part doesn't get passed. >>> at least 80 people died in civil war fighting in syria today according to opposition groups. with bloodshed increasing in the suburbs around the capital damascus. the united nations now puts the toll from almost two years of fighting at more than 60,000. meanwhile, u.s. troops have now arrived in turkey to man patriot missile defense batteries near the border. here's the latest from istanbul. >> reporter: reports emerged yesterday, turkish media saying that 27 u.s. military personnel have flown into the southern city and are about to begin sight surveillance where these patriot missile batteries should go. but it was embellished today saying they have begun the process of flying in military personnel equipment into the military base in the south of the country. that will continue in the weeks ahead. dutch, german missile batteries and military personnel also joining them as nato answers turkey's request for extra defense along that v
string. so there's a balancing act here as the clock winds down. >> i think that's right. i don't think we're looking at a second and third-string problem at this point. jack lew is by any measure a first-string civil servant. but i think your broader point is correct. you think about the bush administration. you saw hank paulson come in at treasury, bob gates at defense. i think both proved to be important in their roles. that doesn't need you need quite the same changeover. one lien is that the predecessors were considered failures. tim geithner's tenure has been controversial but i think broadly speaking what he did to write the financial system will be considered a tremendous achievement in the annals of economic policy-making. but again, they are in something of a rut, i think, in their economic policy-making at this point, and particularly in their approach to dealing with republicans. a lot of that, i'd say frankly the bulk of that blame falls on the house republicans and john boehner. but it's nevertheless a case that they just put somebody into the treasury department who they
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